Welcome to the official blog of Travis Hamon. I am a husband and father of two. This blog is for my interests which include, but are not limited to, Urban Farming, Podcasting, Heroes of Newerth, Geneology, and of course Family.

 

Talk about owning your dream, lol. #latergram #imbatman

Talk about owning your dream, lol. #latergram #imbatman

Seriously San Francisco what the heck?

Seriously San Francisco what the heck?

The inevitable consequences of progress.

The inevitable consequences of progress.

"One should not roam through garbage". #LDSconf

"One should not roam through garbage". #LDSconf

50% of getting good grades is knowing what is due when. #college #UNR #spreadsheetlove

50% of getting good grades is knowing what is due when. #college #UNR #spreadsheetlove

ancientart:

Dharmarajika, a large Buddhist stupa in Taxila, Pakistan.

Taxila is an important archaeological site in the Punjab province of Pakistan, and presents to us the stages in the development of a city on the Indus that was alternately influenced by Persia, Greece and Central Asia. From the 5th century BC to the 2nd century AD it was also a Buddhist centre of learning.

Dharmarajika is both the largest and earliest of the Buddhist religious complexes at Taxia. It was built to enshrine the holy relics of Buddha by Asoka the Great, who was also known as "Dharmaraja", (thus name the name of the site being "Dharmarajka").

This circular stupa is 45 metres high, and constructed in solid stone masonry. It was unfortunately significantly damaged during an earthquake in 40 AD, and was rebuilt twice under Kushana rulers. Stone sculptures depicting Buddha and his life adorned the stupa. 

During the end of the 5th century, the empire of the Kidara Kushanas was lost to the White Huns. Trade was disrupted, and the economic prosperity diminished, leaving places like Dharmarajika without royal patronage. Dharmarajika was ultimately abandoned like many of the other Buddhist Sangharamas at Taxia.

Photos taken by Anduze traveller.

ancientart:

Ute petroglyphs at Arches National Park, Utah, USA.
Photo taken by Jim Mullhaupt.

ancientart:

Ute petroglyphs at Arches National Park, Utah, USA.

Photo taken by Jim Mullhaupt.

ginternet:

megidokis:

Do not hate homosexuals, bisexuals, asexuals, ect
But do not hate heterosexuals.

Do not hate trans*gender, agender, non-binary people
But do not hate cissexuals.

Do not hate people of color
But do not hate white people.

Do not hate women
But do not hate men.

Do not hate Christians
But do not hate atheists.

Hatred only breeds more hatred. Is it that hard to understand?

This needs more attention than it’s gotten.

(Source: megighosties)

ancientart:

Carved bones at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico.

Bone shown in the first photo:

This bone shows fine incisions outlined in black, with the image of the god “9 Wind”, the creator of wisdom and the wind. In Mixtec mythology he is the ancestor of the rulers and gives them power and is recognized by his attributes — the cut shell and the conical hat and mouth mask.

The bones in the second photo have been made into musical instruments:

Carved in a human femur is a xylophone, ke’e, and carved in wood is a noise maker, having two parts to strike on to produce sound. The use of these instruments was only done during religious ceremonies and they were typically carving a depiction of mythological scenes and symbols.

Courtesy & currently located at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico. Photos taken by Travis S.

ancientart:

Sword from the Anglo-Saxon Sutton Hoo ship-burial, dates to approximately AD 620. Suffolk, England.
This sword is one of the many artifacts discovered in the Sutton Hoo ship-burial, which is thought to have belonged to one of four East Anglian kings: Eorpwald, Raedwald and co-regents Ecric, and Sigebert. The artifacts of this burial were chosen to reflect the high rank of the king, and to equip him for the Afterlife.
Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Völkerwanderer.

ancientart:

Sword from the Anglo-Saxon Sutton Hoo ship-burial, dates to approximately AD 620. Suffolk, England.

This sword is one of the many artifacts discovered in the Sutton Hoo ship-burial, which is thought to have belonged to one of four East Anglian kings: Eorpwald, Raedwald and co-regents Ecric, and Sigebert. The artifacts of this burial were chosen to reflect the high rank of the king, and to equip him for the Afterlife.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Völkerwanderer.